acupuncture moxibustion

Learning Chinese Medicine

Back to school last weekend in San Francisco to study the ancient Chinese medical writings with internationally renowned scholars, Elizabeth Rochat and Ken Rose for a post-graduate program called “Teaching From the Roots.” This weekend we cultivated the qi of knowledge. Future classes promise more in depth study of the acupuncture-moxibustion classics.

We are studying the ancient texts to expand our knowledge of the way acupuncture was practiced two thousand years ago by exploring the Classical Literature of Chinese medicine.

While attending, I have met people who are experts in fields of knowledge that I know very little about. I have been studying the ancient Chinese medical classics since the late 70’s, now I can discuss these writings with others who have interest in their teachings. We are trying to understand how the ancient masters practiced, especially areas of our medicine not much taught these days.

Since the time in ’69 when I first read the Dao De Jing, I have learned to read and write many Chinese characters. Years ago I studied the Chinese characters to help me understand the names of the acupuncture points. Chinese medical terms and concepts are often translated using many different English words. Knowing the symbolism inherent in Chinese characters gives me a better understanding of what that term means.

Discussions are in depth and cover much material new to me. I know a little bit, my fellow teachers know a little also—even the course instructors admit to a deficiency of knowledge that designing and teaching this class will help them gain. So Dear Reader, if you are practicing medicine, alternative or orthodox, and are interested in understanding what ancient Chinese teachers had to say about Chinese medicine, this is the class to join. New people are still joining.

Natural Healing

I am reviewing my interviews and teaching videos taken over the last thirty years.

Here are two interviews, one old and one new.

The earliest video, an interview by Rosemary Broccoli in 1986.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rX8Q8Z5MeFE&w=420&h=315]
Michael Turk answers Rosemary Broccoli’s first question, “Michael, how was it you became interested in Oriental medicine?” More of the interview will be posted soon.

Recently, I was interviewed while demonstrating Moxa-Pressure, a technique I developed to quickly relieve many types of pain.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O91xwM344Ac&w=560&h=315]

The following videos of classes are being reviewed for short lessons to publish.

  • I taught three workshops on Acupressure for Headaches, Points for Pain, and Using Chinese Herbs in 1989.
  • In 2006, I demonstrated prenatal massage and taught acupressure massage at the Pacific Symposium.
  • My favorite video in 2007 was a class on the Origin of Chinese Symbolism.

As I publish these videos I will give background information.

Post your questions about health and healing using ancient Asian healing arts.

Acumoxa for Pain Relief

Published in the Lotus Guide. Chico, CA. July 2011

Acumoxa Treatments: Pain Relief Without Needles

Acumoxa quickly reduces chronic pain by soothing acupuncture points with heat, rather than stimulating with needles

What Is Acumoxa?

Acumoxa is a method of treating disease developed by ancient Chinese doctors along with acupuncture and acupressure therapy. Moxibustion is the therapeutic use of heat to treat pain and weakness. The herbs called moxa come from a number of plants; they are processed for easy burning. About 300 years ago, acumoxa became popular with the invention of the moxa stick, called the “grand ultimate divine needle” or “magic needle.” The needle-shaped stick of moxa is held over the acupoints without touching the skin. Applying and removing the heat as needed is easier to teach and use without injuring tissue. Magic needle moxa therapy–noninvasive, nonscarring, and nonblistering–is most effective in relieving muscle pain and arthritis. Acumoxa is not a cure-all some health problems are relieved entirely, while others cannot be helped at all. From China, its popularity has spread to Korea and Japan, where it is a favored method of self-care. Today many smokeless methods of heating acupoints are available.

Acumoxa Today

Chronic pain has become an epidemic that is disabling millions of Americans. New ways to treat pain have not slowed the increase in the number of people suffering. Americans are now turning to ancient Asian methods for self-help methods such as acupuncture and acupressure massage. Acupressure and acumoxa provide many of the benefits of acupuncture–especially pain relief–without using needles.

A History of Healing

Time-tested moxa has been relieving pain and curing disease since the Stone Age. A survey of 33 premodern acupuncture texts–published over a 2,000 year period–reveals a cluster of health complaints for which moxibustion is beneficial; myofascial pain, infectious diseases, inflammatory disorders, and female problems.

Conditions Benefited

Myofascial disorders: Arthritis, tendonitis, low back, and sciatica

Infectious diseases; Bacterial dysentery, hepatitis, chronic bronchitis, and UTI

Inflammatory disorders: Bronchial asthma, simple goiter, diabetes, indigestion, acute mastitis, and hemorrhoids Recuperative: Stroke, adrenal depletion, incontinence, prolapsed anus or uterus

OB/GYN: Irregular menstruation, dysmenorrhea, abnormal bleeding, and leucorrhoea

Pain’s Healing Secret

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